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  • Martha Stewart's Friends show to fold fitted sheets

    Thursday, August, 23rd 2017

    Stay Put Quality

    Matt Damon – You Tube

    We have all experienced the joy of trying to fold a fitted sheet(UGH!). Martha Stewart's friends Kevin Sharkey and Douglas Friedman demonstrate how to fold a fitted sheet in the wind.

    Martha Stewarts friends folding fitted sheets

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  • The American Council of the Blind gave Distinctive Beddings the thumbs up.

    Thursday, August, 1st 2017

    Stay Put Quality

    Joe Steinkamp – 1 day ago

    Joe learned a few new terms at ACB 17 that he would like to share with you all. “Accessible Bedding” and “Stay Put Bedding” were terms Joe wasn’t familiar with before he started this interview with Ruby Russell and Louie Scheel, who happen to be the co-founders of Distinctive Beddings. But these terms may just begin to slip into conversation with others, as these new linen items may just be the greatest thing ever for those of us who never enjoyed making beds with perfectly straight seams or hospital corners.

  • The rare truth about thread count:

    Wednesday, October 5, 2016

    Verticle Markets

    Do you know that on average, we spend 33 percent of their lives in bed? If yes, why don’t you think we should spend this quality time on quality sheets? Sometimes we do want to have this quality time on quality bed sheets but we believe that the higher the thread count, the better the quality which is not so, most of the times. This is exactly what you should know about thread count when it comes to bed sheets.

    What thread count really means

    Using the technical terms, thread count means the number of threads woven together in a square inch when you count both lengthwise (warp) and widthwise (weft) threads. So 100 lengthwise threads woven with 100 widthwise threads produce a thread count of 200. Same goes with 200 lengthwise threads woven with 200 widthwise threads which produces thread count of 400.

    In getting a sense of the varieties of fabric various thread counts produce, consider that a thread count of 75 lengthwise threads woven with 75 widthwise threads, that produces muslin, which feels a little not okay and a bit rough, certainly not silken. Good-quality sheets come in at 180, and anything above 200 is best known to be better quality.

    ¬So what do we say about counts such as 800 or 1,200 which some producers claim? How could you fit that many threads into a single inch? The short answer is you can’t.

    This is simply what they do. More threads can also be woven into the weft threads to multiply the thread count. These multiplied threads are called “picks” and are added in the overall count, which is how some sheets end up having thread counts in the thousands. This is why the idea that high counts amounts for the quality of sheets isn’t really true.

    So in the spirit of free enterprise, buyers demand, and competition among the producers, the producers battle to calculate and make multiples of their tread counts high, higher and highest. They count not just each thread, but each fiber (called plies) th¬at make up each thread. So a single thread might be four plies twisted all together; one manufacturer will call that one thread, while another manufacturer will call that four threads.

    But thread count is really only part of the puzzle as to whether or not you’ll enjoy your nap on your sheets. What about quality of threads and not just quantity? And what’s the big deal with Egyptian cotton anyway?

    You might suspect that thread count is simply a marketing ploy to make Egyptian cotton sheets sound more luxurious. But it’s really a scientific term, with strict federal standard laws on how those threads are counted

    Three things to consider when buying sheets

    Thread count

    But thread count is really only part of the puzzle as to whether or not you’ll enjoy your nap on your sheets. What about quality of threads and not just quantity? And what’s the big deal with Egyptian cotton anyway?

    Firstly, do a random check of the thread count; I recommend a thread count of 200. Going for higher thread count does not give you higher quality as I earlier mentioned. Some people go to the extent of requesting for 1000 thread counts. That’s out of it. Type of cotton

    It is highly recommended to opt for Egyptian cotton. It is the best of all cotton. Though Picommendema which is grown in America is also preferable but Egyptian cotton remains the best of the bests.

    Things to be mindful of when buying sheets.

    It will be good of you when you are careful of extremely low priced, high thread count sheet sets. A complete sheet set with a high thread count that goes for $100 or less is probably not the stupendous bargain you think it is. The price tag for bed linens will vary depending on the sheet size and what items you’re buying, such as a duvets cover, sheet sets, or pillowcases. A reasonable amount of about $150-$250″ should buy a superior quality 200 thread count queen set made of Egyptian cotton and woven in Europe.

    Finally, remember what to look for on the label and be wary of too-low prices for supposedly high quality items. Beyond that, go with what you prefer. Get a good feel of the sheets before buying. Whether you’re unzipping the packaging or lying down on a display bed, make sure the fabric feels good on your skin and soon you’ll be having nice dreams! Now you know that quality is not just about the number, so don’t let numbers have its way to rule your bed and eventually your world!